Tag Archives: new music

Things (demo)

New music! You can hear it here.

I’ve had the idea of ‘looped acoustic guitars’ going around my head for a few weeks now. Finally, I have had time today to grab my scribbled notes & make a basic demo. This way, I not only get to start fleshing out my draft, but it makes me less likely to forget about it altogether!

Still footage from the demo video of ‘Things’

When finished, this piece will be part of a new original music project I am working on. As it happens, I am still recruiting musicians for this project. If you’re interested, based in the North East of England and NOT a guitar player, drop me a message via this site or answer my Gumtree advert or my advert on Join My Band.

The main idea centres around two acoustic guitars using natural harmonics (where you touch a string over a deer without pressing down to create a bell-like chime). This guitars, panned hard left & right respectively, are then overlaid not only with additional instrumentation, but unexpected harmonic colours.

The basic harmony of the guitar ‘loops’ on their own is very predominantly E minor. I intend to add a few variants of this to the finished piece, but the draft I uploaded today features an upbeat, uplifting section base around the chords of G major & C major. Laid over the looping guitars, this gives a feel of extended chords such as G6, Gmaj9, Cmaj11 and others. For this reason, the bass, drums & keys you hear on this demo are kept relatively simple as a result. Following in my previous minimalist drafts, I’ve true not to throw too much in – why over complicate something which doesn’t need it?

Still footage from the demo video of ‘Things’

You can hear my first draft for ‘Things’ (with my pretty basic video of things around my house) online now via my Vimeo page. As always, comments are more than welcome – I’d really love to hear what you think. I’d also like to get the word out so please feel free to share, like, tweet & reblog to your heart’s content!  

Thanks guys! More coming very soon xx

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New video: ‘Waters of Tyne’ (demo)

I haven’t posted a video in a while, so I thought I’d share a quick demo video to show you one if the projects I’m currently working on. 

Having been booked to play an entire set of purely Northumbrian folk music, I have been digging out some if the region’s great melodies & adapting them for solo guitar. I’ve had so much fun doing so that I hope to record some if my favourites later on this year.

For now, here’s a rough demo of one tune I particularly enjoy. Please excuse a) the less-than-perfect quality of sound & b) my guitar-playing facial expressions!

Watch the video here

This piece in this video is a solo acoustic guitar arrangement of the traditional Northumbrian tune ‘Waters of Tyne’. There are already a couple of great arrangements out there, and my version is a mix of some of the better examples available. Like many of those I found, this arrangement uses DADGAD tuning. 

The guitar is my Taylor 314CE (recently cleaned up, re-strung & set up to be my permanent DADGAD guitar). The video was shot & edited using the iMovieMaker app on my iPhone 5s, so apologies for the rather thin sound – a recording on a mobile phone simply doesn’t do full justice to the sound of this wonderful instrument. 

I hope you enjoy this demo. Comments & messages are always welcome. I hope to be sharing more very soon! 

Tim x

Alternate guitar tunings and bringing my old acoustic out of retirement

A fairly decent chunk of this evening has been spent cleaning & re-stringing this old girl.

 

My Taylor 314CE. This guitar was my main acoustic for ten years until I retired her almost exactly a year ago. A decade of gigging was starting to show, so this has been my writing and recording acoustic, until now…

 
I’m booked to play a full set of Northumbrian #FolkMusic on solo guitar at the end of this month. A lot of my arrangements of these old tunes are better suited to an alternate tuning. So for ease, this gig requires a second guitar pre-tuned to the DADGAD tuning, and I can’t think of a better choice than the one in these pictures.  

  

 Since setting the guitar up in this way, I’ve found myself writing more draft solo guitar ideas. It looks like the shift to DADGAD might be a more permanent thing, especially if the creative juices continue to flow…

 
Until next time, keep on pluckin’,

 
Tim x

Advice for young musicians

We all know how it is. You want to prove yourself and show the world (and your peers) that you ‘have what it takes’ to work in music; Self assured and not in need of any advice of pointers from anyone else. How would they know your ‘story’ anyway? How could someone advise you when your style, your sound, your ‘voice’, is unique to you.

True, confidence can be a great asset to our chosen profession. Even in an industry where we work together because it’s the fundamental nature of how music operates, it can get lonely out there sometimes. But a false confidence, or bluff, will leave you alienated and likely to make the same sorts of mistakes thousands of musicians have made before you.

So swallow your pride, take a seat, and listen to a few words of wisdom from those who have made music work – and pay – for themselves.


Keybaord player and composer Ben Folds wrote some advice a few years ago on his Facebook page. Boiled down to the essentials, I found three things especially true:

    Work on finding your own voice
    However much you try, you will always be you. Stop trying to be anyone else and accept this fact. Once you have come to terms with this, work on being the best ‘you’ that you can be.

    Learn your technique, then forget it
    learn as much as you can, as widely as you can. Read about it & practise it. Then follow the advice of the previous point and learn to present these techniques in your own, unique way.

    Before you can express yourself in words, you first have to learn the language; it’s vocabulary & grammar. But think of how many books & poems were all the more interesting for their yearning up of the rules? The same applies to music first. However, to reach this point, you need to know which rules you are breaking…

    Don’t they to force people into liking you or your music
    There will always be people out there who find what you do interesting, provided you are doing it well, and playing from the heart. don’t bend over backwards trying to commercialise your sound, compromising your music in the process. The audience will come to you, so just persist at it.

    This is even more true in our digital age – search for good advice on putting you material online. You should never have to pay to do this, due to the high number of platforms out there. It might be slow at first, but you will eventually reap the fruits of your hard work.


NobleViola.com also features a really interesting article entitled ’10 things I wish I knew when I was a young musician’ which, while echoing the sentiments of Folds, adds the following gems:

  • Practicing isn’t a matter of how many hours you put in, but how many good hours you put in. It’s quality, not quantity.
  • Your body is also your instrument – learn how it works and take care of it.
  • Being professional is a 24 hour job.
  • Keep busy, and do a variety of things. Diversify as much as you can.
  • Love what you do – and remember to nurture that love.
  • As Pat Metheny says on his website, “for me, after everything, the only thing that finally remains really true is the feeling that at the end of the day, I know that I played really good, or I didn’t ; or that I made some progress and understand something that I didn’t understand at the beginning of the day; or I didn’t. This, to me, is the real currency of what it is to have a life as a musician”.

    Well said, Pat.

    As always, comments and responses are more than welcome. Feel free to check out my previous articles too! Enjoy the rest of your week & happy playing!

    Seeing Without Knowing (2) / Sacred Spaces

    It’s been quite a while since I’ve posted on here – writing a dissertation will do that unfortunately. The upside is, I will post abridged versions of each chapter from my dissertation (examining the value of music in wellbeing on a mental, pysical and educational level) on here for you to digest and enjoy over the summer.

    However, I wished to update you on my Sound Art piece, originally entitled “Seeing Without Knowing”.

    For the time being, this project, under its initial outline, has been temporarily shelved. A large amount of its components, namely the absence of the performer, has been retained in the new project. Emerging from the ‘Seeing Without Knowing’ idea came a more specific soundscapes idea.

    Using recordings of simply the ECHOES of a room, as per the original brief, the Sacred Spaces project aims to feature recordings / soundscapes from spiritual spaces and buildings throughout the world, across all cultures and religions. The first of these was recorded in Durham Cathedral on a windy and rain-filled night, April 2015. The sounds were reorganised and edited later that month using ProTools software.

    You can hear the initial demo for this project here:

    http://www.vimeo.com/128493094

    Many thanks to Durham Cathedral for allowing us into your Sacred Space for an hour that evening. Also, many thanks to Sunderland University for the loan of microphones and recording equipment. I hope you enjoy what you hear. Please do feel free to let me know what you think!

    Tim

    Book Review: Higgledy Piggledy Jazz for Classical Guitar Ensemble

    Higgledy Piggledy Jazz is the brainchild of teacher and composer Elena Cobb (http://www.elenacobb.com/index.html), who is on a dual mission to introduce more Jazz into children’s learning, and make it fun at the same time. As well as her books for Piano, Elena also has versions for guitar and alto sax students, and it’s the Classical Guitar Ensemble book I am reviewing today.

    Ten of Elena’s Piano peices have been arranged for a combination of duo, trio and quartets and set in order of technical complexity. The scores are clear and easy to read, with each part clearly marked*. The first few peices in the book are variation on Blues in C and very simplistic. The main melody is one Jazz lick repeated and varied for the chord underneath. The accompanying parts are equaly repetative, and any player beyind the initial stages will quickly bore of it. My suggestion to teachers would be to rotate the lead between players, provided all of them were at the same technical level.

    On the plus side, as the book progresses there are some interesting musical ideas, and the three guitar players Elena has called in to arrange these peices have done a good job here. I really feel the intermeadiate peices work better. My personal favourite is ‘Polka Butterfly’, a charismatic duo which would stretches students into a new style. As mentioned before the page layout is clean and easy to read, and I love Elena’s mission to introduce classical players to the swing rythym, something not widely present in the classical guitar repertiore.

    My one suggestion would be to include a page at the front to explain notation and guitar-specific symbology (such as the fingering labels and guides for which string to play certian notes on). I appreciate that this book is primarily for teachers, who would provide the guidance on these things to young students, but it would serve as a useful look-up reference page when practising at home.

    All in all, this is a useful book for teachers who are looking to encourage their emerging classical guitar students into exploring new styles and mpore contemporary ways of playing. It is also a valuble tool for young ensembles. One of classical guitar’s downfalls is that so often it is a solo venture; it’s uplifting to know tha Elena is working to ensure young students of the guitar do not feel that isolation, and her book will go a long way towards that end. Highly recommended for any classical crossover teachers of children.

    [*N.B. – There is also a Tabluture version of this book, for children who are still coming to grips with reading music]