Tag Archives: Guitar tips

Gear Talk (5): a rare gem

In all of my previous ‘Gear Talk’ blogs, one of the pedals that went unmentioned was this one, the Snarling Dogs ‘Mold Spore’ wah…

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For many years, before I started this blog, this beast was my main wah. It’s heavy enough & solid enough to stay put on stage, and the three options for different voicings make this a very versatile effect to have at your feet. On top of that, it also features a Ring Modulator die some psychadellic nosiness. Both effects can be used seperately or together for some pretty crazy sounds.

The company Snarling Dogs closed nearly twenty years ago, so this already unique effect is now something if a rare find. I had it refurbished & cleaned up a year or so ago, and intended to start using it live again. The thing is, I hardly use wah at all now, so this pedal has been sitting in my cupboard unused.

After a lot of thought, I’ve decided to sell it. Sure, I could keep it as a rare collectors-item. However, the (no small) amount of money I could sell it for now would go a long way towards a new guitar – something that I will actually use. And that seems more important to me. My studio and musical career are areas of work, not a museum.

Still, this bad boy will be missed…

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Seven Nation Army (cover)

My previous blog mentioned a recent recording date with function band Switch. We recorded about three or four tracks for the band’s website, two of which we filmed videos for.

The first video, for ‘Mercy’, you can watch here.

Our cover of ‘Seven Nation Army’ was the second video we recorded that day. As you can tell from the video, we had a bit of fun with this one. It still has quite a few nice shots of my Gold Epiphone Les Paul though…

Guitar wise, this is the LP from the video, using the neck pickup, coil-tapped. The slide is solid brass & it’s going through one of the studio’s Marshall amps (not the Orange stack you see in the video, though that does sound pretty cool).

Thanks to Loft Music Studios for the recording & production of the track, Nemix Studios for the video location and Artifact Media for shooting it! 

Enjoy!

Warm up & practice recommendations

This week, I’ve had the rare luxury of free time. Free time to pick up my guitar whenever I like and play. Not specifially for any particular goal, just to PLAY for the love of playing.

In doing this, it has occured to me just how little I get to do this. Usually I pick the axe up to practice or prepare for an upcoming show or to learn new material. The rest of the time I’m actually at a gig playing.

Using it as a great opportunity to go over my classical repertiore, I found it almost scary how much my disclipline had slipped. Don’t get me wrong, I still play well and in a musically pleasing manner (in my opinion, anyway!) but there are ways of performing on gutar (with classical peices in particular) which enhances the music and makes playing easier (not to mention lessening any strain and preventing injuries long term).

So this week, I have been delving into my old practice and warm up notes and dug out my old favourite, Pumping Nylon by Scott Tennant. For the classical guitarists out there who do not have this book, I strongly recommend you purchase it as soon as possible.

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This book focuses solely on technique improvement for both hands (including thumb for the right hand). After the initial basics and starters, it progresses into joint techniques (working exercises for both hands together) and demonstrates a closer look into flamenco techniques. These not only go to strengthen your right hand, but to widen your overall playing ability. It also includes specially written study peices to incorporate all the techniques it has taught.
About eight years ago, I suffered a broken ring finger on my right hand. This has never fully regained it’s original strength (and as a result my regular concert days are mostly behind me). The exercises in this book went a long way in helping my rebuild the muscle and bring my ability back, something I feared would necver happen. Because of this, the right hand techniques and exercises int his book are of particular importance to me.

That’s the basic warm ups covered, but what about actually rehearsal starters? For me, as with many classical guitar players, the studies (or ‘Etudes’) of Francisco Tarrega and Fernando Sor provide plenty of examples for rehearsal focus, especially with right hand technique. It’s absolutely amazing the depth of ground these two player/teacher/composers covered in advancing the technical study of the guitar and I cannot recommend them highly enough.

Alongside these, there are also the studies of Mauro Giuliani. Although his concert and recital peices are widely known (in fact the staple of most player’s repertiore), his studies are often neglected. However, I would definitely suggest investing in a transcription of his complete studies. While not as technique-practice heavy as Sor (who, in contrast, is remembered historically more for his studies than his concert peices), they present a more musically varying set and some new colour into your practice routine.

My standard practise routine (looking at my old notes from my true classical playing days) went roughly as follows:

5-10 mins warm ups (both hands, featuring exercises from Pumping Nylon and scale practice)
Selected studies from Sor, Tarrega and Giuliani (2 or 3 from each, focusing on specific improvement areas)
Looking at any new peices to learn; slow play-through; focus on tricky areas; attempt to play through without stopping (I would try not to spend more than 20-25 minutes on this to prevent fatigue or frustration – the peice can be returned to on the next day)
A better known peice which also requires mastering. Ideally play-through should be reached far more quickly
Another peice (already known) to ‘refresh’ the fingers (ideally this will also be an upcoming concert peice)
‘Free playing’ – At this point, I could have been rehearsing for up to an hour and a half, so this should be an old favourite or two which you know well, to act as a ‘cool down’. Be careful, though, to remain watchful on technique and accuracy, as this is more likely to slip on peices you are over familiar with.

These, of course, are my tips only. I would however be deleighted to hear from other guitarists and their tips/routines for warm-ups and rehearsals. You can contact me via this blog or via my Twiiter handle: @tim_guitarist

Good luck and happy practising!