Tag Archives: electric guitar

A song for Black Friday: Mercy (cover)

Is it Black Friday? Have mercy…

Tenuous enough of s link for you? Good.

Earlier this year I hit the studio with function band Switch, and this cover of ‘Mercy’ (made famous by Duffy) was one of the tracks we recorded.

The guitar I used was the same one you can see in the video: Fender Modern Player Stratocaster going through one of the in-house Marshall combos at the Loft Studios.

Thanks to Loft Studios, Newcastle upon Tyne, for the recording session & production. Also many thanks to Nemix studios (also Newcastle), which was our location for the video, and to Artifact Media for the film production!

Enjoy!

Gear Talk

I’ve been asked about the gear I use a fair few times this year so while I have a little spare time today, I thought I’d share with you details of the regular equipment I use.

ELECTRICS
My main guitars (which go out on every electric guitar gig) are both Mexican ‘Fat Strats’ by Fender. Both are made of Alder and feature Rosewood fingerboards.

The spare (my black one) was bought from the USA already customised, with humbucker in the bridge position and one master tone control. Where the second tome used to be is now a three-way toggle to split the humbucker to either half on their own or fully combined, which works brilliantly for acoustic simulation (and a lot less hassle than lugging an acoustic guitar about for one or two tunes!).

The main (blue one, pictured) is a Mexican ‘fat’ Strat (humbucker in the bridge). A few years back, I upgraded all three of the pickups. The bridge now houses a Seymour Duncan J-45 (usually used in Les Pauls) which gives a delightfully ‘throaty’ but open overdriven sound. The middle pickup is a Seymour Duncan ‘Cool Rails’ – but don’t let the name fool you – this packs a wonderfully modern-sounding punch and effectively gives me a humbucker in the middle position. Plus, switching to the position between bridge and middle gives an amazing ‘quack’ sound that cuts through a full band mix brilliantly when both clean and driven. The neck is a Fender Vintage Noiseless. This is my only single coil on the guitar and I wouldn’t have it any other way. I love the ‘pout’ you get from the Strat’s neck pickup and would never sacrifice what is my all-time favourite guitar tone for a little extra power.

AMPS AND EFFECTS PEDALS
My electric amp is a ten+ year old Fender Stage 100. They don’t make these any more but are without a shadow of a doubt the best transistor amplifier out there. I gig far too much to deal with the unreliability of valve amps and with one this good (and thanks to the 12″ Celestion ‘Greenback’ speaker, an amp this LOUD) I hopefully never need to. It’s been serviced twice in all of the time I’ve had it (since new) and works a real treat.

Should I ever upgrade, I have heard good things about Fender’s digital range and tried out a Roland 80 Cube last year. While the Cube impressed me a lot, it only had two switchable channels, and I’m rather spoilt by having the option of an additional drive channel with my amp, so looks like I’m sticking with it for now.

I don’t use many effects but rely on a BOSS OD3 as a solo boost (or occasionally as an ‘additional overdrive channel’ when I need a different sound to my amp.
My main solo boost pedal is a rather cheap and relatively unknown make, called a ‘Vintage Overdrive’ (JF-01) by Joyo Pedals. Joyo are a Chinese company and this pedal features the same chip inside as the classic TS-808 Tube Screamer. Put simply, it sounds amazing for lead work. I cannot recommend this pedal highly enough (and it costs less than £30 – you may as well buy two so you have a spare handy)!
My other effects are a Digital Delay (another wonderful Joyo creation) and a Cry Baby Wah-Wah.

ACOUSTICS
Classical: Admira Sevilla.
Higher-level ‘student’ model with a solid Cedar top. One of the most beautiful-sounding guitars I have played in this price range, and my nylon-strung axe of choice for solo classical gigs.

Electro-Acoustic: Taylor 314CE.
I first tried out this guitar over ten years ago, then shopped around for SIX MONTHS for another guitar which felt so comfortable and natural under the fingers, not to mention sound anywhere near as good. I failed, and eventually had to stump up the extra cash to buy the Taylor. It was money very well spent. Taylor’s range is extensive and I seriously suggest you try one out – they will have something which suits you, particularly if your style is heavily folk/fingerstyle based.

The gear I use has seen me through countless gigs, concerts and studio sessions with very few problems all in all. That said, if anyone has equipment out there that they feel would suit me (I play a huge range of styles) please do get in touch – I will happily borrow a guitar/amp for a weekend or two and put it through it’s paces at a few gigs, then review for you. My reviews appears on this blog, but will also happily write (or edit the blog to suit) for other gear/guitar review sites, as well as your own media. Get in touch via the blog or find me on Twitter (@tim_guitarist) to discuss!

Happy playing!